To America: Personal Reflections of an Historian

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To America is the somewhat- autobiography and memoir of Stephen Ambrose. The book talks about his perspective on issues throughout American History , as well as his various experiences that have slowly shaped him into the person he was.

To America : Personal Reflections of an Historian

It also covers topics, such as Western expansion and The Transcontinental Railroad. It was written only months before he died in October From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. His son is following in his footsteps with "The Pacific", but isn't quite the writer his father was. Thoroughly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in the subject of history, not to mention history itself. Sep 22, Guy Choate rated it really liked it. I'd never read any of Ambrose's books, so this book provided a nice survey of his body of work through Writing about the events in history that shaped this country had to have been a lot different in than writing about them a year later, after we'd invaded Iraq.


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Ambrose writes with such optimism toward the way America is seen around the world. At one point he talks about what the future of warfare will look like--essentially rebuilding a nation's infrastructure while earning that nati I'd never read any of Ambrose's books, so this book provided a nice survey of his body of work through At one point he talks about what the future of warfare will look like--essentially rebuilding a nation's infrastructure while earning that nation's trust.

I wonder what Ambrose would have to say about our last decade in Iraq. Without that perspective, he delivers an ode to this country, and it left me with a good dose of patriotism. It also filled me with nostalgia for the way we were before this costly war. Jan 30, Michael Gerald rated it really liked it. The last book of the American historian Stephen Ambrose, it's a collection of the author's different essays on a wide range of subjects in American history, from the 18th to the 21st centuries.

A fascinating part of this book is Ambrose's personal admission that some of his earlier beliefs and positions about American history were wrong, views which were popular then but which later turned out to be misguided. And also consolidating other assessments, especially America's decisive role in victor The last book of the American historian Stephen Ambrose, it's a collection of the author's different essays on a wide range of subjects in American history, from the 18th to the 21st centuries.

And also consolidating other assessments, especially America's decisive role in victory in the Second World War and the Cold War. May 01, Rob rated it it was amazing Shelves: five-stars , favorites. If you love history, and the stories about the people who shaped our destiny, pick up this book. It made me want to read all his books and I enjoyed some of his personal anecdotes.

Made me want to read all his books and see the D-Day museum in New Orleans. Jul 14, Penny rated it liked it. Audio book Familiar with Ambrose from "Band of Brothers", "D-Day" and "Citizen Soldiers" I looked forward to this collection of thoughts and reflections by a famous historian. I had so enjoyed the collection of speeches and essays by David McCullough, that I was sure I would love this book too. I'm ambivalent. The life of a historian can be very interesting. Researching and writing, telling stories of people, not just the battles and politics.

Ambrose certainly had opportunities to research, inte Audio book Familiar with Ambrose from "Band of Brothers", "D-Day" and "Citizen Soldiers" I looked forward to this collection of thoughts and reflections by a famous historian.


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Ambrose certainly had opportunities to research, interview and read first hand accounts of a variety of important historical figures and events. I appreciated the overview of his career and writing process. Where I began to take issue with him, was the cheery bluster PR about how great America is and the derogatory comparisons with soldiers of other countries. For an historian, it felt quite biased and dipped into the waters of propaganda. His idolization of Andrew Jackson, glossing over his intense hostility to Indians and Blacks because he saved the country by winning the battle of New Orleans during the War of is a little uncomfortable.

His opinions and treatment of Ulysses S. I suspect Ambrose thinks he's being wise and generous to Grant, reminding us that we should appreciate what Grant did to end the Civil War. He fails to make the connection between the hatchet job Southern historians and textbook publishers intentionally did to President Grant. Yes, there was some corruption in his cabinet, but the real crime in their eyes was his dedication to Lincoln's vision for reconstruction and equality for blacks. There's a boastfulness to Ambroses' opinions that can make you cringe.

He repeats that when asked advice on how to be a good writer, he suggests marrying an English Major and having her read your work and contribute--without credit.


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  4. Yep, just take the little woman's contribution as your own. That's okay. You own her, don't you? He admits that he was the deciding vote to prevent women from joining a club. What grated the most, were his belief that Mississippi, Louisiana and other southern states have overcome racism and everything is just fine now.

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    To America: Personal Reflections of an Historian - Stephen E. Ambrose - Google книги

    His belief that American soldiers are the best because they know right from wrong and other soldiers around the world don't. His opinion that women DO have equal rights already. So just as I'm about to give up on the book, he has a chapter on the contribution of immigrants and the how diversity IS our secret strength as a country. In this current epoch of Nationalism and the rebirth of White male supremacy--these were really good words to hear. There were several quotes from Dwight D. Eisenhower another of Ambrose's subjects that made me yearn for Republicans from yesterday.

    I do not recognize the party today. I am so sad for what has become. So I give it a 3 star review.

    Patriotism in America - Are Americans Misguided?

    It's an okay read, but not as strong or insightful--or uplifting--as I had hoped it would be. Oct 05, Terri Lynn rated it liked it Shelves: history , nonfiction. I had to read this for a graduate school seminar. I am not wild about American history.

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    Still, Ambrose gives a unique view of events and it feels like you are time traveling with Ambrose. Ambrose almost lost me when he explained that his father refused to "give" his mother "permission" to get a job since he and his brothers and dad thought a woman's place was at home taking care of her husband and kids and finally he "gave her permission" to get involved in local boards and she got elected but h I had to read this for a graduate school seminar.

    Ambrose almost lost me when he explained that his father refused to "give" his mother "permission" to get a job since he and his brothers and dad thought a woman's place was at home taking care of her husband and kids and finally he "gave her permission" to get involved in local boards and she got elected but he "refused to give her permission" to run for state office or Congress.

    When does a grown woman need permission? Is she a dog, a slave, or one of the kids? Fortunately, his views were later modernized and one of his most admired people was feminist author Betty Friedan. Likewise, in speaking of western expansion, he says whites didn't treat the Native American tribes any worse than they treated each other so killing and stealing their land is therefore okay because some tribes had fought each other?

    He never veered away from this opinion.

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    I saw a reviewer say that it gives readers a ride back to an era when people felt good about American history. I don't feel good about a history of stealing land from Natives, killing them off, oppressing women, keeping blacks in slavery, Jim Crow, hatred and abuse of gays, J Edgar Hoover witchhunts or Salem witch trials , ramming Christian mythology down the throats of non-Christians through force of law, dropping nuclear bombs on two civilian cities full of babies, kids, housewives, old people, and other innocents nor locking Japanese-Americans up for being of Japanese ancestry.

    I'm just that way. There is a lot of personal stuff thrown in including why he opposed the Vietnam War and protested on campus which led to a rift between him and his family. Historical events involve real people and real consequences. One part I loved was how he criticized founders like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson for writing lofty words about all men being created equal while not considering blacks equal and owning them like property. Aug 07, Corey rated it liked it. Ambrose is a good historian.

    When he's simply storytelling, it is when he's at his best. I was excited to read the personal viewpoints of a longstanding historian. But I forgot to take into account that I'd be reading an many generations prior to my own, white, professional, and privileged male's opinion. While Ambrose's is liberal, and I do find it interesting and valuable to learn opinions of those who came before you -- and who spent their lives studying history -- Ambrose often was an apolog Ambrose is a good historian. While Ambrose's is liberal, and I do find it interesting and valuable to learn opinions of those who came before you -- and who spent their lives studying history -- Ambrose often was an apologist for America's past terribleness.

    To America: Personal Reflections of an Historian by Stephen E. Ambrose

    He seems to do under the guise of "fairness", but you can explain why a situation happened, without being an Apologist for it. Also, this was only a banner he wore for America's history -- he doesn't apply the same burden of "fairness" for other countries. The zeal of patriotism often weakens his "insights". You can love your home of America-- its places, people, history, and hopes --, feel duty to it, without crying out its exceptionalism which he does or remarking on its almighty goodness and justification in all aspects.

    I don't care about American Exceptionalism, the US being special or not. I care that we work for the democracy we uphold. That we evolve and work to always do better in ways of justice and righting the wrongs we've allowed to unfold, etc.